Meet Saki

by Caz Morton

Meet my black, sassy brother in Christ! We have so much in common – we both love fashion, are black, love Jesus and have bodies of steel. Meet Saki (this story has been written with permission).

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As I was editing the above image, my mate looked over & said jokingly, “wow! Saki is a poser & full of sass. I love this guy!” And we do all love him. I can see how much God has grown him through the relationships he’s built in Kids EE. I can also see how God has protected his life, equipping him for a ministry to a niche of people who are often not reached.

I arrived in Fiji with a wall up – the road in Tonga was bumpy for personal reasons, but Saki flawed me. God unexpectantly put him in my path & I’m so grateful He did. We connected immediately with our love for fashion, and that’s without even sharing and connecting with the deepest parts of our Christian walk.

Saki has plenty of reasons to walk away from God & complain, considering what he has faced in life. I asked Saki about struggles and he didn’t hesitate as his eyes lit up while he shared how God had kept him alive. We bonded over shared, messy health experiences, in particular how people’s attitudes change when you something is physically wrong. Unlike Saki, mine is now invisible, but there was a time my injury was public – when I was in my back brace for 5 months. This caused relationships to change drastically. It was as if I had caught the black plague, apparently unapproachable. Or, as Saki said you get “those pity eyes” as the norm. When an accident occurs, it’s hard to see how it affects your family & friends. You know they want to help, but you have this underlying guilt of ‘I don’t want them to have to go through this or bare my burden’. Guilt: it’s an emotion Satan loves to vandalise and explore, however, it’s a reality you have to come to terms within your own walk. However, there is great power over darkness and shame when you have people who understand your unique situations.

Saki had bone cancer when he was 10. They amputated his leg, although, in hindsight, they could have saved his leg. This angered me so much, but Saki was quick to say “I wouldn’t change it, what God has taught me, I would never change. It’s given me opportunities I never would have had and helped me to see God in a different light.” He had cancer again 13 years ago but praise God for remission over a decade. He shared with me struggles with self-image, his purpose when he was younger and being picked on for being different. I wish my 15-year-old self was in Fiji when Saki was ten – I would have cartwheeled into the bullies face, held Saki’s hand & prayed the bullies away in Jesus name. But he didn’t need a protective sister, he has a protective Heavenly Father. Having those struggles forced Saki to trust God and fix his eyes on Jesus saving plans. He is clothed in the armour of God (Eph 6:10-18) & when adversity comes he’s equipped in multitudes. People better watch out!

Saki is also the eldest of 6 & has a heart for serving in kids ministry (another reason we connected). I think if he could, he would adopt half of India, as I would with Sri Lanka. I love how God has been equipping him for a huge ministry, meanwhile, he resides in Fiji. Please pray for opportunities to share his unique faith story. What made my heart bounce was whilst on mission is when he shared with our Kids group “I can’t sit around worrying when I’m alive. God has helped me survive every day to possibly help someone else in need who might be struggling the same way.” What Joy God brings in the life of my brother Saki, he’s touched my life on so many levels, he is all S.A.S.S. in a good way:

Saki:
Saved
Amputee
Survivor
Servant

God has protected us both in similar ways, the emotional scars are healing & both being restored (2 Cor 5). For now, will continue to survive in Jesus name.

 

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Meet The Writer: Caz Morton 

Adopted by Grace, adopted from Sri Lanka.
Past handstand queen,
Proud member of the fashion police.
Recovering spinal and sternum injuries.
Follow@jeanellen on Instagram,

Winterfest 2016

Winterfest is over, God in His goodness sustained me through the week in a way far greater than I could have ever imagined.

As Winterfest approached at the end of term two, I confess, I started to freak out. I know the physical drain/impact a Holiday Kids Program can have on my body – this wasn’t my first rodeo… but last Thursday God gave me what I call a gentle ‘slap’ from the Holy Spirit. How self centred I was to think that a week of telling kids about Jesus had anything to do with me. How arrogant I was to feel like my health could hinder God’s work. How faithless it is to enter a week of mission, relying on my own strength (or lack thereof). My prayer quickly changed – if I was going to get through this week and if God wanted to use me, it was up to Him to sustain me.

In 2 Corinthians 12:9, God says to Paul, “My grace is sufficient for you, for My strength is made perfect in weakness.” My response? Therefore most gladly I will rather boast in my infirmities, that the power of Christ may rest upon me.

God is faithful. I may be in agony now, but I made it through the week because of His faithfulness. I am grateful for the reminder that every step I make is based on God’s sovereign power and for His glory!

Now to rest my weary and achey body with all things pink, Annie, tea, my onesie, fluffy dressing gown, Netflix, a massive sleep in, “everyday I’m shuffling” on repeat in my head every time I walk (or more accurately, my attempt to walk that resembles a slow hobble), and the joy and peace that comes from knowing I was able to be part of the proclamation of the gospel this week.